Social Science and Public Policy

Richard Freeman

backpublications - HIV and AIDS policy

HIV and the blood supply in the United Kingdom: professionalization and pragmatism

Publication Type: chapter in book      Source: Bovens, M, t'Hart, P and Peters, B G (eds) Success and Failure in Governance. A comparative analysis of European states, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar
Date: 2001       Link: http://www.e-elgar.co.uk/bookentry_mainUS.lasso?id=1772


 

Policy Responses to AIDS in Europe
Bennett, R and Freeman, R

Publication Type: research report      Source: European Commission EUR 17789 - Research on bioethics - AIDS: Ethics, Justice and European Policy
Date: 1998


Prevention as a problem of modernity: the example of HIV and AIDS
Scott, S and Freeman, R

Publication Type: chapter in book      Source: Gabe, J (ed) Medicine, Health and Risk. Sociological Approaches, Sociology of Health and Illness Monograph Series, Oxford: Blackwell
Date: 1995


 

Governing the voluntary sector response to AIDS: a comparative study of the UK and Germany

Publication Type: chapter in book      Source: Kuhnle, S and Selle, P (eds) Government and Voluntary Organizations. A relational perspective, Aldershot: Avebury
Date: 1992


The politics of AIDS in Britain and Germany

Publication Type: chapter in book      Source: Aggleton, P, Davies, P and Hart, G (eds) AIDS: Rights, Risk and Reason, papers from the fifth conference on Social Aspects of AIDS, Brighton: Falmer
Date: 1992


 

Governing the voluntary sector response to AIDS: a comparative study of the UK and Germany

The impact of AIDS on Western polities serves as a useful indicator both of social values and of political and organisational relationships. At the same time, community-based nonprofit organisations have been at the forefront of AIDS policy-making and service development. Taking Britain and Germany as case studies, this paper discusses similarities and differences in the functions accorded to the voluntary sector in the pattern of responses to HIV and AIDS. Typical problems confronted by emergent voluntary sector welfare agencies are noted and particular features of AIDS service organisations described. Separate accounts are then given of the development of a federated network of AIDS service organisations (ASOs) in Germany and of contrasting experience in the UK. While governments have shared a concern to confine the activity of ASOs to serving the needs of those groups directly affected by AIDS, other significant differences in policy development may be attributed to differences in the organisational structure of the health sector.

Publication Type: journal paper      Source: Voluntas 3 (1) 29-47
Date: 1992       Link: http://www.springerlink.com/content/w11n60265526/?p=319b70e2e52541d79d606c065a033a65&pi=68


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